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A Modified Extracorporeal Circuit To Attenuate Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome; Kevin McCusker, PhD, CCP

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Abstract

This book explores the validity of utilizing a modified extracorporeal circuit to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response syndrome known as SIRS. Attention is directed specifically at the existence of this disease within the setting of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, commonly referred to as CPB; a standard technique utilized when performing cardiac surgery. Effort is focused on how this new and innovative Pinnacle System enables the reduction of inflammation within this field of clinical surgery, as compared to that of the existing standard bypass system.

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Description

A Modified Extracorporeal Circuit To Attenuate Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome by Kevin McCusker, PhD, CCP (Paperback, 194 pages).

Abstract

This book explores the validity of utilizing a modified extracorporeal circuit to attenuate the systemic inflammatory response syndrome known as SIRS. Attention is directed specifically at the existence of this disease within the setting of cardiopulmonary bypass surgery, commonly referred to as CPB; a standard technique utilized when performing cardiac surgery. Effort is focused on how this new and innovative Pinnacle System enables the reduction of inflammation within this field of clinical surgery, as compared to that of the existing standard bypass system. This was achieved by measuring and comparing research results derived from both bypass systems, such results were obtained from 214 participants who were selected as secondary research samples. Quantitative research methodology was selected as the appropriate research technique, incorporating both a true prospective experimental design and random assignments of participants to equal groups; one such group was allocated to be operated on utilizing the standard bypass circuitry, and the second group were likewise allocated to the new Pinnacle System. This new circuitry incorporated improvisations to the surface coatings, reduction of the priming volume, reduction in both air and blood transit time within the extracorporeal circuitry, and removal of the air blood interface. In addition, the Pinnacle System offers unique circuit configuration characteristics, such as the ability to run an open or closed configuration thereby negating inflammatory mediators. The objective was to establish and measure the ability of the Pinnacle System to both enable the enhancement of hemocompatibility in the patient’s blood when in contact with the circuit’s artificial surfaces, and to determine the biocompatibility of the materials used in the construction of this new bypass system. Findings conducted by this research study suggest that Pinnacle System enhances post-operative results with less blood loss, less time of ventilation, reduction in the period spent in ICU and overall time of hospitalization; such positive outcomes enabling both financial savings and improved patient wellbeing. Perhaps future research can continue to further explore the possibilities enabled by this unique circuitry design thereby contributing to enhanced patient care, reduction in healthcare costs, and improved clinical efficiency.